Church of the Holy Sepulchre | Churches in Israel

Part of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Visiting the Churches in Jerusalem is something any Christian and Non-Christian would probably consider during their tour.

Whether you visit the Holy Land as a part of a Pilgrimage or just a looking for some adventure, the churches in Jerusalem is a must-see.

Jerusalem is one of the oldest cities in the world and has great significance for Christians, Jews, and Muslims.

Its role during the ministry of Jesus and the Apostolic Age is the reason for its importance for Christianity.

Also, many events such as the Last Supper and Peter’s denial of Christ occurred in the city. They were honored centuries later with the commission of Churches.

Jerusalem is home to so many churches and collecting all of them in one list is almost impossible.

We also recommend you to consider visiting some of the churches as a part of an organized or Private tour.

This is because many of the churches mentioned in this list have a very limited visitation time.

Holy Land VIP Tours offers you the opportunity to visit those churches in the following tours:

In the following list, we have chosen the Churches we think you must pay a visit.

7 Churches in Jerusalem for your Christian Tour

  1. Church of the Holy Sepulcher

    Jerusalem Old City
    The Church of the Holy Sepulcher is one of the most famous churches in Jerusalem. It stands in the location of Jesus’ resurrection and has been a location of pilgrimage over a millennium. Christians of all denominations and people from all around the world come to visit the church.
  2. Church of All Nations

    East Jerusalem
    This beautiful Catholic church contains multiple mosaics representing the 12 nations that helped fund it. The church’s location is the tranquil Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives – another significant reason to visit. This olive tree garden dates to the times of Christ. The venue is famous for its eight beautiful olive trees, dated to be around 2,000 years old.
  3. Church of Saint Anne

    Via Dolorosa at St Stephen’s Gate
    Built in honor of St. Anne, mother of the Virgin Mary, this 12th-century Basilica in Jerusalem is one of the finest examples of Crusader architecture in the Holy Land and throughout the Middle East. The most amazing acoustics and incredibly friendly caretakers make this church a desired attraction for both Christians and Non-Christians.
  4. Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu

    On the slopes of Mt. Zion, just outside the Old City.
    The Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu is a church you should include in your list. It was built in 1931 in remembrance of Peter’s denial of Christ and repentance.“… before the cock crows twice.” (Mark 14:30).
    Before entering the church, try to pain attention to its top. You will be able to sight a golden rooster protrudes prominently from the sanctuary roof. It was placed in honor of its biblical connection.
  5. Church of the Pater Noster

    Mount of Olives
    This wonderful church is also the traditional site where Jesus taught the Our Father prayer. In the church you will find over 150 large wall plaques of the prayer written each in a different language, a testament to the human family under one “Our Father.”
  6. Church of St. James

    Armenian Quarter, few meters from Jaffa gate
    This Armenian Orthodox is a unique church and one of the oldest in the old city. Open just for 30 minutes to visitors per day the church is a must visit place.
    There is no electricity inside, with only oil lamps that lighten the space. The survivors of the Armenian genocides brought with them many of the relics you will find in the church when they fled their homeland.
    It is also believed that the head of St. James is buried on the left side of the Church’s main door.
  7. Church of Saint Mary Magdalena

    Armenian Quarter, Jerusalem’s Old City
    This remarkable Russian Orthodox church is dedicated to Mary Magdalene, the companion of Jesus. It was built by the Russian imperial dynasty in the 19th century. The church is also the burial place of two martyred orthodox saints, Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia and her fellow nun Varvara Yakovleva.